Website:

www.frontiermaterials.net/teaching.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Powepoint slides

CHEN 5230

NanotechnologyMetalsBand Diagrams - BasicsBand Diagrams DetailsCarbon Nanotubes Conducting PolymBJTsBJTs-FETs-MOSFETSCMOS BasicsCMOS Process StepsConducting Polymer FETMESFETsSolar - FutureSolar Devices -1Solar Devices - 2Indium Tin OxideSurface Finish - BasicsSurface Finish - Advances

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Powepoint slides

CHEN 5290

Green chemistryNanotechnologyGreen engineeringNanofiber puzzle Corrosion Nanoethics Nanosilver Carbon nanotubesIntro biodegr. plasticsPolyhydroxyalkanoatesPolyhydroxyalkanoates-2Surface finish for PCBsSurface finish for PCBs-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PowerPoint Slides

10.523

NanotechnologyBand Diagrams - BasicsBand Diagrams DetailsCarbon Nanotubes Metals Conducting PolymBJTsBJTs-FETs-MOSFETSCMOS BasicsCMOS Process StepsConducting Polymer FETMESFETsSolar - FutureSolar Devices -1Solar Devices - 2Indium Tin OxideSurface Finish - BasicsSurface Finish - Advances

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slides

Green chemistry Green engineering Nanofiber puzzle Corrosion Nanoethics Nanosilver Carbon nanotubes Polyhydroxyalkanoates Surface finish for PCBs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Handout 1 Handout 2 Handout 3 Lecture - Nanotechnology Lecture - Bandgap Lecture - Carbon Nanotubes Lecture - Metals Lecture - Conducting Polym

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.529

Green chemistry Green engineering Nanofiber puzzle Corrosion Nanoethics Nanosilver Carbon nanotubes Polyhydroxyalkanoates Surface finish for PCBs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14.310

Lecture 1Lecture 2Lecture 3Lecture-4Lecture- polymers (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.523

Handout 1 Handout 2 Handout 3 Lecture - Nanotechnology Lecture - Bandgap Lecture - Carbon Nanotubes Lecture - Metals Lecture - Conducting Polym

 

 

 

 

 

SPRING 2017

TEACHING CALENDAR

SPRING 2017

CHEN 5230 Nanomaterials & Electronic Materials Processing

Sanjeev K. Manohar
sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu

Office: Southwick Hall 254A; Office Hours: Tue, Thu, Fri: 4-5pm

Objectives:

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in the synthesis, characterization and processing of soft organic electronic materials. New concepts would be introduced, and students will be challenged to critically evaluate these concepts, including experiments that can be used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into two parts, or modules: (i) introduction to nanotechnology and nanoscale electronic organic polymers and electronic devices, and (ii) synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes and electronic devices made using carbon nanotubes.

 

Outcomes:

Students will:

1. Become familiar with the general synthesis and processing of major classes of conducting polymers.

2. Become familiar with basic concepts in semiconductor physics, materials used to construct electronic devices, including major processing steps used in the electronics industry.

3. Become familiar with recent advances in carbon nanotube synthesis and technology, including electronic devices constructed using carbon nanotubes.

4. Have read at least 15 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of nanoscale devices and processing.

 

Assessment:

Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature and solve problems assigned to them. They will also be evaluated on their ability to read and comprehend their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.

 

Grading:

Exams (2) .........60%
Quizzes (classwork + homework).....40%

Exams:

Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak with me several classes in advance.

 

Homeworks

Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.

 

Pre-requisites:

Strong background in chemistry required. Some background in materials process and electronic devices could also be helpful.

 

Honesty:

The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.

 

Website:

www.frontiermaterials.net/teaching.html

_______________________________________________________________

CHEN 5290 Recent Advances in Nanotechnology and Green Chemistry
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Dr. Sanjeev K. Manohar
Alumni Hall 103; 978-934-2574; sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Office hours: M,W,Th 11am-noon

Objectives:

The course has 2 overlapping parts: (i) an introduction to nanotechnology and green chemistry with a focus on nanoscale electronic polymers, and (ii) a more in depth exploration of green/sustainable concepts in the overlap area with nanotechnology.

Students will come across scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and should be able to identify new concepts.

 

Assessment:

Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (they will have to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately), and solve problems assigned to them during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.

 

Grading:

Exams (2) .........60%
Quizzes (classwork + homework).....40%

 

Exams:

Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.

 

Course Outcomes:

    1. Become familiar with the 12 principles of green chemistry (and green engineering).
    2. Become familiar with the fundamentals of nanotechnology, its promise, and over-promise.
    3. Become familiar with the synthesis of major classes of conducting polymers, and their broad applications (the “crutch”).
    4. Become familiar with the synthesis and applications of carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene.
    5. Become familiar with challenges facing green/sustainable technologies (via quizzes).
    6. Become familiar with advances in corrosion prevention, including the fundamentals. 
    7. Read 12-15 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of nanotechnology, conducting polymers and green chemistry.

 

Pre-requisites:

You must have completed organic chemistry to take this class. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the organic chemistry concepts before, do not take this class.

 

Honesty:

The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.


_______________________________________________________________


31.525 Experimental Conceptualization
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar

sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: M/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in chemistry and challenge them to think critically about experiments used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into three parts, or modules: (i) introduction to new concepts and methods in nanotechnology and nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) corrosion, and corrosion prevention methods, and the use of conducting polymers for corrosion inhibition, and (iii) cosmochemistry and the chemistry of hydrogen cyanide polymers. Students will also learn to link several organic chemistry topics, such as, addition/elimination reactions, nucleophilic/electrophilic substitution reactions, and aromatic rearrangements, to polymer synthesis and reactivity.
Outcomes:

Students will:

  1. Become familiar with the synthesis and characterization of major classes of conducting polymers, and their broad applications.
  2. Become familiar with new concepts in nanoscale synthesis and ways to synthesize polymers at the nanoscale, including a basic understanding of nanodevices.
  3. Become familiar with advances in corrosion prevention, including the fundamentals.
  4. Become familiar with the synthesis and application hydrogen cyanide polymers.
  5. Have read ~30 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of macromolecular science.
  6. Be able to map concept with experiment covering a wide range of topics.
Assessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (they will have to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately), and solve problems assigned to them during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.
Grading: Exams: 10% Each 30%
Homework: 10% Each 40%
In-Class Presentation 15%
Final Exam 15%

The course is graded on a curve.
Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: You must have completed organic chemistry to take this class. I will assume that you are familiar with concepts such as nucleophilicity, aromaticity, keto-enol tautomerism and stereochemistry. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the concepts mentioned above, do not take this class.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.

 

 

10.523 Electronic Materials Process
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar
sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: W/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in the synthesis, characterization and processing of soft organic electronic materials. New concepts would be introduced, and students will be challenged to critically evaluate these concepts, including experiments that can be used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into two parts, or modules: (i) introduction to nanotechnology and nanoscale electronic organic polymers and electronic devices, and (ii) synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes and electronic devices made using carbon nanotubes.
Outcomes:

Students will:

1. Become familiar with the general synthesis and processing of major classes of conducting polymers.

2. Become familiar with basic concepts in semiconductor physics, materials used to construct electronic devices, including major processing steps used in the electronics industry.

3. Become familiar with recent advances in carbon nanotube synthesis and technology, including electronic devices constructed using carbon nanotubes.

4. Have read ~30 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of nanoscale devices and processing.

Asssessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature and solve problems assigned to them. They will also be evaluated on their ability to read and comprehend their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.

Grading:

Exams: 20% each ........60%
Homework: 5% each........30%
Research report (1) .........10%
In-Class Presentation (bonus) .........5%

The course is graded on a curve.

Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak with me several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: Strong background in chemistry required. Some background in materials process and electronic devices could also be helpful.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.
Website: www.frontiermaterials.net

_______________________________________________________________

10.529 Advances in Nanotechnology and Green Chemistry
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar
sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: M/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in chemistry and challenge them to think critically about experiments used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into 3 parts: (i) introduction to nanotechnology and green chemistry with a focus on nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) green chemistry and the overlap area with nanotechnology, and (iii) Green engineering.
Assessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (they will have to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately), and solve problems assigned to them during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.
Grading:

Exams (4): 60%
Classwork/Homework: 20%
In-Class Presentation 20%
The course is graded on a curve.

Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: You must have completed organic chemistry to take this class. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the organic chemistry concepts before, do not take this class.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.


_______________________________________________________________


31.525 Experimental Conceptualization
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar

sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: M/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in chemistry and challenge them to think critically about experiments used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into three parts, or modules: (i) introduction to new concepts and methods in nanotechnology and nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) corrosion, and corrosion prevention methods, and the use of conducting polymers for corrosion inhibition, and (iii) cosmochemistry and the chemistry of hydrogen cyanide polymers. Students will also learn to link several organic chemistry topics, such as, addition/elimination reactions, nucleophilic/electrophilic substitution reactions, and aromatic rearrangements, to polymer synthesis and reactivity.
Outcomes:

Students will:

  1. Become familiar with the synthesis and characterization of major classes of conducting polymers, and their broad applications.
  2. Become familiar with new concepts in nanoscale synthesis and ways to synthesize polymers at the nanoscale, including a basic understanding of nanodevices.
  3. Become familiar with advances in corrosion prevention, including the fundamentals.
  4. Become familiar with the synthesis and application hydrogen cyanide polymers.
  5. Have read ~30 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of macromolecular science.
  6. Be able to map concept with experiment covering a wide range of topics.
Assessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (they will have to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately), and solve problems assigned to them during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.
Grading: Exams: 10% Each 30%
Homework: 10% Each 40%
In-Class Presentation 15%
Final Exam 15%

The course is graded on a curve.
Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: You must have completed organic chemistry to take this class. I will assume that you are familiar with concepts such as nucleophilicity, aromaticity, keto-enol tautomerism and stereochemistry. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the concepts mentioned above, do not take this class.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.529 Advances in Nanotechnology and Green Chemistry

Office Hours: M/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Office Hours: W/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

PLEASE CHECK YOUR UML E-MAIL FOR REGULAR UPDATES (no personal e-mails please)

FALL 2010

Objectives: 
The course is divided into 3 parts: (i) introduction to nanotechnology and green chemistry with a focus on nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) green chemistry and the overlap area with nanotechnology, and (iii) green engineering. Students will first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts.
 

Outcomes:

  1. Become familiar with the fundamentals of nanotechnology, challenges and promise.
  2. Become familiar with the synthesis of major classes of conducting polymers, and their broad applications.
  3. Become familiar with the synthesis and applications of carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene.
  4. Become familiar with challenges facing green/sustainable technologies.
  5. Become familiar with the 12 principles of green chemistry and green engineering.
  6. Become familiar with basics of nanomedicine, particulate drug delivery.
  7. Become familiar with advances in corrosion prevention, including the fundamentals. 
  8. Have read ~15 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of nanotechnology, conducting polymers and green chemistry.

Assessment:   

Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (at times they will be expected to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately). Homework assignments frequently require use of specialized books from the library or use of the internet.

Grading: 

Exams (3):                                       60%
Classwork/homework                         20%
In-class presentation:                        20%
The course is graded on a curve.
           
Exams:    Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.

HW:     Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due.  I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying".  If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.

Pre-req:    You must have completed organic chemistry-I to take this class. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the organic chemistry concepts before, do not take this class.

 

SPRING 2008

ENGINEERING  MATERIALS:  14.310
Fall 2008
Syllabus

 

 
Description Atomic structure of matter, types of bonding, crystallography, role of imperfections and diffusion. Electric, magnetic, dielectric, and semiconducting properties. Mechanical properties, corrosion, and phase diagrams.
Objectives
  1. To familiarize students with the structure of engineering materials (metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites) at the atomic and microstructural levels.
  2. To familiarize students with the relationships between structure and properties for engineering materials.
  3. To familiarize students with the relationships between engineering materials properties and processing.
Prerequisite General Chemistry 1
Outline (to be distributed).
Text W. F. Smith
Foundations of Materials Science and Engineering, McGraw-Hill, 2004.
Grading Three 1-hour exams that includes the final: 75%; Quizzes, homework, etc. 15%; Service learning project: 10%.
Service Learning Component:

To be discussed in coming weeks.

 

Grading Scale

A

90-100

C

65-74

AB

85-89

CD

58-64

B

80-84

D

50-57

BC

75-79

F

0-49

 

Relationship of Course to Civil
Engg Program Objectives
Partial fulfillment of the following Program Objectives:
  1. Develop the creative and critical thinking skills essential in identifying, structuring, and solving complex problems.
  2. Firmly ground students in the fundamentals of mathematics, the basic sciences, and the engineering sciences necessary to pursue a successful career in civil engineering.
Relationship of Course to ABET
Criterion 3 Program Outcomes
  1. Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  2. Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
  3.  

Instructor / Office Hours Dr. Sanjeev K. Manohar
sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
978-934-3162
Office Hours Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 11:00am-12:00 noon
Honesty   The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty.  Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work.  Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one's own work of material that is not one's own.  As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.

 

SPRING 2008

10.523 Electronic Materials Process
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar
sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: W/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in the synthesis, characterization and processing of soft organic electronic materials. New concepts would be introduced, and students will be challenged to critically evaluate these concepts, including experiments that can be used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into two parts, or modules: (i) introduction to nanotechnology and nanoscale electronic organic polymers and electronic devices, and (ii) synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes and electronic devices made using carbon nanotubes.
Outcomes:

Students will:

1. Become familiar with the general synthesis and processing of major classes of conducting polymers.

2. Become familiar with basic concepts in semiconductor physics, materials used to construct electronic devices, including major processing steps used in the electronics industry.

3. Become familiar with recent advances in carbon nanotube synthesis and technology, including electronic devices constructed using carbon nanotubes.

4. Have read ~30 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of nanoscale devices and processing.

Asssessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature and solve problems assigned to them. They will also be evaluated on their ability to read and comprehend their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.

Grading:

Exams: 20% each ........60%
Homework: 5% each........30%
Research report (1) .........10%
In-Class Presentation (bonus) .........5%

The course is graded on a curve.

Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak with me several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: Strong background in chemistry required. Some background in materials process and electronic devices could also be helpful.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.
Website: www.frontiermaterials.net

_______________________________________________________________

10.529 Advances in Nanotechnology and Green Chemistry
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar
sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: M/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in chemistry and challenge them to think critically about experiments used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into 3 parts: (i) introduction to nanotechnology and green chemistry with a focus on nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) green chemistry and the overlap area with nanotechnology, and (iii) Green engineering.
Assessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (they will have to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately), and solve problems assigned to them during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.
Grading:

Exams (4): 60%
Classwork/Homework: 20%
In-Class Presentation 20%
The course is graded on a curve.

Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: You must have completed organic chemistry to take this class. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the organic chemistry concepts before, do not take this class.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.


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31.525 Experimental Conceptualization
University of Massachusetts Lowell

Sanjeev K. Manohar

sanjeev_manohar@uml.edu
Electrical Engg. Room 106

Office Hours: M/Th/F: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in chemistry and challenge them to think critically about experiments used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into three parts, or modules: (i) introduction to new concepts and methods in nanotechnology and nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) corrosion, and corrosion prevention methods, and the use of conducting polymers for corrosion inhibition, and (iii) cosmochemistry and the chemistry of hydrogen cyanide polymers. Students will also learn to link several organic chemistry topics, such as, addition/elimination reactions, nucleophilic/electrophilic substitution reactions, and aromatic rearrangements, to polymer synthesis and reactivity.
Outcomes:

Students will:

  1. Become familiar with the synthesis and characterization of major classes of conducting polymers, and their broad applications.
  2. Become familiar with new concepts in nanoscale synthesis and ways to synthesize polymers at the nanoscale, including a basic understanding of nanodevices.
  3. Become familiar with advances in corrosion prevention, including the fundamentals.
  4. Become familiar with the synthesis and application hydrogen cyanide polymers.
  5. Have read ~30 journal articles highlighting currents trends in the general area of macromolecular science.
  6. Be able to map concept with experiment covering a wide range of topics.
Assessment: Students are evaluated by their ability to comprehend advanced concepts from current literature (they will have to read their assigned manuscript in class and present to the class immediately), and solve problems assigned to them during class presentations. In addition, there would be homework assignments would require the use of specialized books from the library, or use of the internet. In addition, students will be evaluated on three exams.
Grading: Exams: 10% Each 30%
Homework: 10% Each 40%
In-Class Presentation 15%
Final Exam 15%

The course is graded on a curve.
Exams: Exams will begin at the beginning of class on the days posted, no one will be allowed in after 10 minutes. If you have a scheduling conflict, make sure that you speak to the instructor several classes in advance.
Homeworks: Each homework assignment must be handed in at the beginning of the class that it is due. I hope and expect that students will study together. But there is a significant difference between studying together and "copying". If two or more students hand in assignments that are, in my estimation "too similar", I will request that the students involved meet with me individually to discuss the assignments in greater detail.
Pre-requisites: You must have completed organic chemistry to take this class. I will assume that you are familiar with concepts such as nucleophilicity, aromaticity, keto-enol tautomerism and stereochemistry. You must also be familiar with the basics of organic polymer chemistry. You need not have done extremely well in organic or polymer chemistry; in fact, many people will find that the concepts of organic chemistry become more understandable in this context. But if you have never heard of the concepts mentioned above, do not take this class.
Honesty: The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that the student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related to applications for enrollment or the award of the degree, and/or the submission of one’s own work of material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary proceedings.
   

Copyright © 2005 Sanjeev Manohar

Copyright © 2005 Sanjeev Manohar